Moto Guzzi California 1400

Kevin Ash
MotoGuzzi_Cal_1400

Moto Guzzi has released the first picture of the all-new California 1400.

The bike, powered by the biggest production V-twin to come out of Italy, offers an appealing modernised take on the traditional California look, characterised by huge tank cutouts to make room for the cylinders.

The bike is longer, lower and sleeker than before, and is likely to come with switchable engine maps, traction control, ABS and cruise control.
Full details with lots more pics here at ashonbikes.com on November 13.

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blanddragon
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Great another bike I want. When will I get a bigger garage?

Navy Boy
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I'm looking forward to the more in-depth review any time now. This bike looks like a real contender in the cruiser-tourer class.

Nice and it's made me smile this morning which must be a good thing.

unconventional rebel
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+1

I love the present 1100 range, a Vintage is top of my list when some spare money comes in. In addition to my current Cali obviously... I'm a bit concerned though that with this bike Guzzi are going for an oversize engine.

There's plenty of lardy cruisers with unnecessarily huge engines on the market for those that like them, I hope Guzzi keeps low weight, handling and usability (as a priority over pub bragging rights) for those of us that don't.

MoDa
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I read 322 kg for the Touring/Custom model. Not light at all unfortunately.

Navy Boy
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True but weight figures aren't as impression-forming on this class/type of bike as they are in other areas of the market. I'm thinking that this could be the thinking man's cruiser-tourer.

shuggiemac
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It is quite an impressive lump of motorcycle when you see it in the flesh that is for sure. It certainly has presence.

unconventional rebel
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Not seen one in the flesh yet but I do like it in the pics.

Agreed, weight isn't crucial in this class, but that doesn't mean all cruiser type riders like waddling down the road leaving a shower of sparks on every corner.

At present a light(ish...) decent sized cruiser which handles and stops like an old Le Mans may be a niche market, but I think could become increasingly popular in the future - with the trends moving away from sports bikes. I like 'em anyway, and I'm usually a year or two ahead of modern trends (or completely disconnected from them as my better half thinks....).

Guzzi and Triumph are the main contenders in this segment of the market, 322kg is a big jump from the quoted 263kg of the 1100cc model. Depressing. I just hope Guzzi don't abandon their Italian roots. I wait (geddit?) for a full test with baited breath.

Captain Scarlet
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It looks great and build quality on modern Guzzi's is impressive. Having just bit the bullet and bought a Road King Classic, I must say that I'm loving this genre of retro cruiser segment. For those wanting a lighter touring-cruiser/bagger, maybe try the HD Switchback?

Navy Boy
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Or a Triumph Thunderbird.

Following Mrs NB's revelation about passenger footboards and the fact that I'd like some form of lockable luggage we're back to looking at Electra Glides. I do like the Road King too though, usefully lighter too.

Alas the Switchback just isn't good enough for the two-up stuff that we want to do I'm afraid. A shame as I really like it.

shuggiemac
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Captain Scarlet wrote:
. Having just bit the bullet and bought a Road King Classic.

What !?!?! I thought the Triumph was your 'keeper', it's lasted even less time than the Diavel :-) Or do you still have it?

roundincircles
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shuggiemac wrote:
Captain Scarlet wrote:
. Having just bit the bullet and bought a Road King Classic.

What !?!?! I thought the Triumph was your 'keeper', it's lasted even less time than the Diavel :-) Or do you still have it?

Oh come on Shuggie......you know El Capitain! The TEx was a keeper....you just have to understand what a keeper is!

unconventional rebel
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Captain Scarlet wrote:
It looks great and build quality on modern Guzzi's is impressive. Having just bit the bullet and bought a Road King Classic, I must say that I'm loving this genre of retro cruiser segment. For those wanting a lighter touring-cruiser/bagger, maybe try the HD Switchback?

I suppose being Cap'n Scarlet allows a lot of bullet biting?

Isn't the Switchback the same weight as the new Guzzi?

I too require good 2 up touring ability.

Captain Scarlet
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"Following Mrs NB's revelation about passenger footboards and the fact that I'd like some form of lockable luggage we're back to looking at Electra Glides. I do like the Road King too though, usefully lighter too."
... Both the Road King and Road King Classic have rider and pillion running boards as standard, plus a natty little heel rocker gear-shift if you want to keep the toes of your blue suede shoes as Elvis intended. The Road King hard saddlebags are lockable as standard and the RKC classic bags can be locked with accessory locks that HD sell. So you don't have to go for an Electra Glide if you're looking for more accommodation/comfort than the Switchback, and yet lighter weight than the Electra's, whilst still having secure luggage when touring.

"I thought the Triumph was your 'keeper'"
... nope. The Diavel looked great, and had excellent character, but wasn't that practical or comfortable on long-rides. The eXplorer was well equipped, practical and comfortable but was aesthetically anonymous and didn't engaging character like previous Triumph and indeed it's younger sibling has. The Road King Classic provides a fair bit of practicality (quick-detach torso-saving screen and saddlebags, cruise control, great seat, 250 mile range, etc) whilst also oozing character, sounding like only a Harley can and looking absolutely drop-dead gorgeous from every angle. It's tech: Brembo ABS, keyless ignition, rear cylinder shut-down management, seamless tanks, air-shocks, internal cables, gyro-canceling indicators, etc, isn't too shabby either. Like the Carbon Diavel, when parked up, it stops everyone in their tracks whilst they soak up the ambiance and always say simply 'beautiful'. The RKC 'is' the keeper, I genuinely mean that. About time too (30th bike!). It'll get a backrests and a rack in 2013 and maybe some Rhineharts/stage one in 2014, then probably a suspension upgrade via Progressive in 2015. No rush, I love it just as it is!

"you just have to understand what a keeper is!"
... what he said! ;-D I'll probably buy a second 'part-time' love at some point, could be a Wide-Glide or an F800GT or something, but no rush the RKC comprehensively fills the void

I hope your CVO Road King arrives early RIC! It won't harass too many MTS's in the twisties, although I'm getting close to the tyre edges with no running boards/road interface yet, which is a bit surprising, so it can dispel a few pre-conceptions for sure.

"I too require good 2 up touring ability."
... Mrs. S. did about 60 miles on it last Sunday and enjoy it. In fact she pronounced it 'the best bike you've ever owned', so I guess that's one pillion vote in favour then!

I had a (polishing chrome won't get you home) chrome bracket fitted yesterday, along with a replacement Zumo GPS cable (via Twisted Throttle) wired into the ignition to run my 660. I rode 260 (mainly twisty, mountainous) miles today (so already over 400 miles in it's first week, zero commuting!) and it just breezed it. So Solvol supplies aside, it can tour with the best of them.

Oh, for sure it's 'only' 60-80 mph everywhere, but it's got a great cold-winds defeating windshield the best standard seat I've every used, which means my usual 50, 40, 30 mile between feeling forced to get off, became 80, 60, 50 (even then, a few miles more wouldn't have been uncomfortable). And coupled with a six (US) gallon tank / 250 mile range, I'm not forced to get off the bike more frequently. So tortoise and hare wise, it's made a very good 'average speed over the day' machine. I'm usually wasted after 220 miles or so, but at 260 miles today I could have done another 50-100 easily, without thinking about it. Oops, Guzzi thread and I like the (orig and this retro) Cali, but yes, loving my RKC.

unconventional rebel
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Just curious Captain, have you ever owned a Guzzi Cali? Or has anyone else owned both a Cali and an HD for comparison? I've always assumed the Cali would ride rings round a comparable HD, is this still true though?

I've looked at Harleys a few times but I have been put off buying one by the high prices in the UK and the advice of others that I shouldn't own one. Also they tend to ridden here by either 1% ers or wannabe's, neither of which are an image I want. On the other hand Guzzi's oddball image suits just fine - as you can tell from my nom de plume.

My Guzzi's a keeper, 7 years and 60,000+ miles. That said I have 4 other bikes on the road at present...

Captain Scarlet
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I don't know how many different models of motorcycles I've ridden. I did work it out once, about ten years ago and it was well over 150, so gawd knows what it is now. But do you know what? I've ridden everything from K1's to MT01's to Laverda Jota's and yet I've never ridden a Guzzi. Not one... that I can remember, anyway. I always said I'd buy a Dr. John replica if they did it properly and I do like the Cafe Racer they've just brought out and the Cali too, but not ridden either. I think the thing that traditionally put me off was build quality and financial woes. Those are both thankfully gone, but the dealer network has always been dire poor wherever I've lived, which put me off a little. My local Ducati dealer did stock Guzzi's two years ago, a pretty decent full range too. But I'm pally with the owners and they told me that after a year of literally no sales enough was enough and they dropped the brand.

I would say, off the top of my head, that a Guzzi is as well made and reliable as a Harley, with similar horsepower and slightly lighter weight. I doubt their torque is as strong and of course it will sound more boxer than Milwaukee Iron, so that's worth whatever it s too you, as is the 45 degree rumble of a Harley versus the Guzzi's lope of cylinders. A Guzzi isn't for me really. But then again a Royal Enfield isn't either and neither are bad machines, just different to what appeals to me as an individual.

I think my last word there is important. Individual. You have to be your own. I don't care if people say, wow he went from an S1000RR, to a Diavel, to an eXplorer to a Road King Classic, how messed up is that? Each has made perfect sense to me at the time and nobody ever gets to the end of their lives and then think to themselves I wish I owned fewer bikes and had less sex right?

Some people don't 'get' Harley's. That's fine vive la difference. But just as I won't slag off a Guzzi having never ridden one let alone owned one, I wish 'experienced' riders didn't slag off HD when they usually have absolutely zero genuine experience of riding or owning a modern Harley. If they did, they'd realize that they are as well built and as reliable as anything out there from 'any' manufacturer. You've probably heard the same bigotry against Guzzi's when yours has clearly done 60k miles.

I told my friend (a Ducati mechanic, and Ohlins technician, who went on the Panigale launch in the US) that I'd bought the RKC and expected him to cringe. He told me that, unbeknown to me, he still has a late 60's Pan-Head in his garage that he's done over 100,000 miles on. And compared with the current 103 mill that's like comparing a '66 boxer with the forthcoming partial WC boxer. I've only owned three Harley's, a Dyna, a Softail and Tourer. My own experience is that they have been 100% reliable. Regrettably that's not been true of either my BMW's or even Honda's of which I've owned six of each. More reliable than Honda? Surely that's not bad company to keep is it?

unconventional rebel
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I couldn't agree more with your post Captain, but still think you ought to have a go on a Guzzi, be a shame to lie there on your death bed thinking "I wonder what they are like?"

Regarding my comment about peoples advice to me re: Harleys I think it sounded wrong. The advice has come from HD owners and a dealer when I once nearly took the plunge, it is more about me than a pop at the bikes. I habitually ride through our salt laden winters (I'm off on a 4 day trip tomorrow on the Guzzi) and rarely wash let alone polish vehicles. I know I should, I just don't like doing it. The dealer looked at the completely knackered GS750 I'd ridden in on, looked at me, looked at the Harley and said "don't buy it, you'll kill it." I think resale values were uppermost in the HD advice to me rather than knocking the bikes themselves. As for the image in the UK, well it is what it is for better or worse, I ain't knocking that. The prices however....

I will own an HD at some point when I'm rich enough, always fancied an older model, they fit my early dreams around Easyrider. Someday, before I shuffle off this mortal coil, I'm going to ride coast to coast in the US, probably on a Harley.

As for the handling, as you know the Cali has essentially the same rolling chassis as the Le Mans, including the Brembo brakes and Marzocchi forks, resulting in a fine handling (in an old fashioned way) machine with a shed load of ground clearance, which fits the UK road network. The image I have of HD's is not the same, certainly on the older models, but in my ignorance I'm open to be shown wrong?

unconventional rebel
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Oh yes, "as for the individual", well said Sir.

I currently ride a 50cc Mobylette, a Honda 250 Nighthawk, an old Z400, a 1000cc V Strom and the Cali outfit. I love every one, they all make sense to me & me smile, I could care less about the conclusions others may or may not draw?

Captain Scarlet
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Yes, I don't want to get to the Pearly Gates and St. Peter say to me, 'Why the hell didn't you have sex on a Guzzi'? LOL! ;-D

There's a thread on the monkey-spanker webbo-shite, about Italian reliability, that has a posting today "My missus bought a brand new Guzzi 750 Breva last year and after 200 miles, there was an oil leak from between the cylinders. It turned out to be a porous crankcase and the engine had to be rebuilt with a new one. Not a small job ..." For every one of those, or an imploded 900SS, we can hear of owners like yourself or Shuggs who have had nothing but good experiences with your Guzzi or Ducati's. But just as people worry about shaft-drive and fuel-pump failures on Beemers (my six were fine on that front), similar stories can put would be owners off. And one key problem with that is, even if people are willing to bite the bullet and carry the (perceived) risk, others will not which does directly affect residual values. Again, no big deal if you keep your bikes for ever, but if you don't happen to get along with it or simply fancy a change further down the line, it's back to the old supply and demand adage, and (arguably Ducati aside) that's something that seems to have affected every Italian marque, often even when trading in against the same brand again, which can smart a little - I've been there! :-D

"The advice has come from HD owners and a dealer when I once nearly took the plunge"
... owners are worth listening to, to appreciate they've experienced. They'll always be different experiences with different owners, but if enough feedback is negative it can sow doubt seeds, which I empathise with. I doubt the dealer was a Harley dealer? My local Yamaha dealer thinks HD's are tractors and that I ought to buy a Star from him 'because they are more powerful' (I think we're on a different page!) and my Harley dealer thinks there's 'a rice burner custom is no substitute for the real thing'. I think both views are flawed, I hate hearing a dealer put down another shop or brand, it's a bit insulting to the customers intelligence that they can't think for themselves and form their own judgements.

Plenty of HD's do get ridden right throughout winter in the UK. When I lived there it always used to astound me frankly, like a weird oxymoron. However, spray it to death with ACF50, WD40, 645, Duck Oil and Vaseline (if you're that way inclined) early November and then wash off again in April. It won't look as pretty, during winter, but when you wash it off again at least they'll be a bike underneath it still. Alternatively buy an eXplorer! :-D

"The image I have of HD's is not the same, certainly on the older models, but in my ignorance I'm open to be shown wrong?"
... no, I believe you are right. The 1340 cc Evo engine saved the company, but it was still a bit lumpy and lacking oomph until they went to the 1458, then 1586(?) twin-cams. Now it's 1690 (103 ci) and all the better for it. Same with the brakes, wooden until recent years when they adopted Brembo ABS. Ground clearance was also laughably bad too, until 2009/10 when the touring models frames went through a 67% beefing-up improvement. The latest Harley's are very good bikes, the older one's... hhmm, not so much IMHO. Still, maybe the same is true of Guzzi's?

"I could care less about the conclusions others may or may not draw?"
... yep, be your own man. Always. I may be deeply flawed and imperfect, but I am at least the man that I want to be. I can look myself in the mirror each morning with the confidence that I'm not a lemming / sheep / pterodactyl (del as applicable). :-D

Navy Boy
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The only Guzzi I've ridden was a V11 Sport (Red frame and metallic limey green bodywork - What there was of it) back in 2000. I liked it rather a lot but owned a Honda Firestorm at the time and couldn't see myself taking the plunge.

Perhaps its time I renewed the relationship? When is the 1400 Cali due to be on sale here in the UK?

shuggiemac
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Congrats on the new Harley Cap'n. I know that we occasionally disagree on certain things but we agree on more and generally have the same underlying passion for anything motorised on two wheels.

There is never a need, in my opinion, to justify a choice in bikes to anyone other than the person buying it. Hell's teeth I consider my collection to be somewhat eclectic and from a rather broad base and I also do not care a jot what others may think. I do believe that in this little corner of t'interweb that the contributors do not judge and those who do have never seemed to hang around long.

You are absolutely correct in the summation of my experience with Ducati and I make no bones nor secret of my bias toward the brand. Not that I am blinkered to them and indeed I feel they have to perform even higher to meet my expectations. The Diavel Strada falls well short and I do not mind saying so. I actually now do not bother responding when I see people making the throw away comments about Ducati reliability etc. If they are daft enough not to have done a bit of simple research then it is not my place to try and persuade them as they are already in an entrenched position and the comments of a stranger on the web are unlikely to make a difference. I also have way better things to do with my time.

I share you dislike of dealers slagging off another brand or wider genre. It rips my knitting quite severely actually and I feel like they are showing themselves do be lacking in some fundamental business area. I hate the term 'rice burners', 'crotch rockets' etc etc - don't know why, I just do. I have a very good friend here who does track days with me, including our annual trek to Misano. He is in his mid fifties and is the kind of motorcyclist I like to be around. He has an immaculate Streetfighter that he uses on the track and money is no object in keeping it in tip top condition. He also has a Harley that is his pride and joy and you would swear looking at it that it is a new model with zero kilometres on it. Then you learn that it is about ten years old with nearly 200,000 km. I knew him for some time and had no idea that he had a Harley until I went to his house after maybe a year and saw it. He does not feel the need to ram it or any of his passions down other peoples throats. His latest purchase is a mid sixties Triumph race bike that he wants to run in veteran road race events.

During the years I lived in the US I was drawn toward Harley's but never took the plunge as I simply did not have the money as a young man then. I have however ridden them quite extensively and with the exception of a very poorly set up Road King in the Alps, which handled like an oil tanker in a swimming pool, they have all been great experiences. I personally could not see me buying one here now that I am in Czech Republic however, not that the locale has anything to really do with it. I am not sure why but nothing in their range right now catches my eye. I very much hope that in years to come they may add something that does. Guzzi on the other hand is a different story and I have always had a huge soft spot for them. I am sure the fact that my love of all things Italian has an influence on that too and I make no apologies for it. Models like the Griso, all the V7 variants the custom version of the 1400 California etc just stir something in me. I have ridden a few Guzzi's and I know that one day I shall own one.

The new California is an impressive looking lump of metal and I sincerely hope that it does well for them.

MoDa
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I thought Kev meant 2012 when he wrote:

"Full details with lots more pics here at ashonbikes.com on November 13."

My bad ;-)

Captain Scarlet
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"Congrats on the new Harley Cap'n."
... thanks Shuggs. I know that sentiment is echo'd by the other regulars on here too.

I agree, being self-opinionated is fine if you also respect others views and choices; those over-keen to judge others and flogging a dead horse whenever anyone dares to question their views don't tend to stand the course on this forum as you say.

Rather than creating a secular clique, I'd just like to think that this place is full of live and let live riders, who welcome all others with an easy going nature. Especially if they are as passionate as the rest of the regulars

A Streetfighter, Harley, a mid sixties Triumph race bike, and humble with it too; it sounds like your friend is the sort of guy that we could all have empathy with. My two best friends happen to be millionaires (by true coincidence), but it took a long time before they began talking openly about their wealth, investments and possessions. The well healed (of which I am not, in relative terms) do not feel the need to boast or unnecessarily talk about it.

"The new California is an impressive looking lump of metal and I sincerely hope that it does well for them."
... I agree. To me, it looks right from all angles and has a timeless appeal about it that will still be cool in decades (never mind simply years) to come. This is the way that I feel about the Road King Classic too. I'd like a second bike at some point, maybe an 848 Streetfighter or something, but my next 'bike' will actually probably be a replacement for my SUV. And as that's likely to cost a lot to change, it could be some time before I'm buying any more bikes again, I'm not as rich as my humble friends! :-D

Captain Scarlet
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Just read the Guzzi test. A nice review and good pictures as always.

The things I really like about it are the unique and almost curvy Maltese cross like headlight, the frenched-in rear lights, the buddy-seat and grab rail style illusion, the tank cut-aways accentuating the cylinder heads and a few peripheral things such the angled tyre valves.

Some aspects look a little budget, like the bar clamps and leftover switchgear when the heated grips aren't fitted, basic seat stitching and no fancy-dan chromed heads or anything. And for me other aspects like a digital odometer and 125 four-stroke aping exhaust canister ends, are just plain wrong looking. But on the whole pretty well and faithfully executed in line with it's lineage.

The two main stumbling blocks for me, if I were buying this model, would be: price - it's Harley Davidson money; and fuel economy/range, as both seem very poor. The HD tourers will take the rider between 250-300 miles and burn much less fuel whilst doing so. The Victories aren't far behind HD in this respect either.

But as traditional touring-cruisers go, this Guzzi has to be the best Europe has ever offered?

unconventional rebel
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Agreed, nice bike and a good write up. Perversely I'm not sure about the headlight though. Might be better in the flesh.

It's good to hear Guzzi has kept the characteristic shake but smoothed out the vibes higher up the range - although they have never really bothered me. Also good to see they have kept the light feel handling, maybe even improved it? Older Cali's had the tendency to run wide a bit when pushed IMO.

Fuel economy is a surprise, I commonly got 50mpg as a solo on my '03 Cali, 55mpg on steady 80mpg cruising was normal. The fuel light was always pessimistic leaving a good 60 miles in reserve, same bias with the new bike?

Not sure about the fairing, I find I only want one at speeds over 70mph, otherwise I'd rather go without. I ditched the similar one on my Cali and replaced it with a small headlight job which makes 80mpg cruising OK and can be ignored otherwise. If I have a fairing I want it to work properly and enable autobarn speeds in comfort.

I would still have preferred Guzzi to upped the power output to the new levels but kept an 1100 engine, and the weight to the old level. Or am I just being reactionary?

All that said, given the funds I'd buy one - or probably go for an 1100 Vintage plus a second hand V7 for the same money. I hope it's a success for them at any rate.

Navy Boy
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I have to say that I really like this and it's got to be a good thing for the cruiser-tourer market in general that Guzzi are willing to put such time, effort and resource into this.

Hopefully I'll get to see it in the flesh this coming weekend at the NEC.

MoDa
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Kev, there seems to be something wrong with your fuel consumption numbers. You write

"30mpg (13.5km/l, 7.4l/100km, 25.0mpg US), and at higher speeds on more open roads only 38mpg (10.6km/l, 9.4l/100km, 31.6mpg US)"

Did you perhaps mistake 30mpg for 38mpg and vice versa. If not, the km/l numbers in brackets make little sense.

No matter what, these are scary numbers. Would be end of story for me. Hope it is a mistake.

[Well, probably I should worry more about how to pay the 180% danish registration tax. Makes it more than 45 kEuro, I would guess.]

Navy Boy
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Another nice little touch I've just noticed... That front mudguard is properly long and will offer some decent protection to the oil cooler just behind it.

Why can't more manufacturers do that?

loubike
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Wow. Been a long time since I've been on here. I guess you could say the Guzzi brought me back. I am now on the 3rd version of a California, a 2001 Moto Guzzi Jackal I picked up with only 2700 miles on the clock. Selling my other Calis was a mistake in the past and it's taken me a few years and many other bikes to come back to MG and appreciate the soul and character of these machines. For me, there are not quite any other motorcycles on the planet like them. Quirks and all, I suppose.

While I have not owned any Harleys, I have driven many of the modern ones and I will grudgingly admit that while their styling is not to my tastes, they are very nice and well executed bikes. Modern ones much more pleasurable to ride than the older models for sure. Comparing MGs to HDs is a discussion that can linger on for days I've found :) But anyhow, very generally speaking, I have found the Guzzi cruisers to be more "standard" bikes than the Harleys, meaning they are considerably lighter, more applicable overall (but certainly less in some areas), and handle much better in the twisties. Power to weight ratio is good and even the power curve on the Guzzi is substantially different than other cruisers where the California's real power comes on later rather than low down. Due to this curve, power/weight ratio, and wonderful Tonti frame, they have the capability of being "fun" if you want. Having said all this, there are many areas that would prompt Joe on the street to buy HD over MG. Again, very generally I have found the finish on the Harleys to be better overall, a few of them (Softail and up) more comfortable for long haul days, and don't even get started on dealer support and network as I really believe this, not bike design and such, is the biggest problem facing Guzzis - whereas it is one of the strongest aspects of owning a Harley, at least in the States it is where HD dealers everywhere and support reportedly outstanding.

This new Cali seems to really break with the past on many fronts and appears to be MG's first real effort at competing with the likes of other big baggers such as the RK, Triumph T-Bird, and so on - now even competing with them on their own turf so to speak. It's not that the old Cali couldn't compete with these bikes; rather, it's just that it did so very stubbornly, barely fitting in even into the "cruiser" group with an almost upright riding position, different and afforementioned power curve, and endearing/alienating quirks all around. The new Cali is certainly gorgeous and has many, MANY advances over the previous models. In making these changes, however, I worry they may have turned away from many of the things that I find enjoyable with my current MG. On paper the 1400 would seem to have more power, more amenities, more comfort, more everything than my current Cali. But my Jackal has full Hepco Becker setup, custom touring saddle, giant and relatively heavy barndoor screen, and still with all this it clocks in at barely over 600lbs, that's in the very least 150lbs or more leaner than this new bad boy. I love that my current MG is a wonderful all-around motorcycle. The new MG looks purrrty but can you really say an almost 800lb motorcycle is a great everyday rider? I'm not saying it's impossible; I'm just skeptical. And too, the fuel economy numbers Kevin addresses in the review are becoming more and more concerning to me. I don't doubt his numbers. My current Cali gets 35mpg in the city, 40-42 highway. Even with all the technological trickery in the world, it would not be expected they could increse the engine, weight, and power of the bike and expect it to return comparable economy. Also, with all the new improvements, I'm disappointed they only slightly changed the fairing/windshield on the bike as weather protection will not be greatly improved and certainly still inferior to bikes like the RK.

So the new California is stronger, faster, smoother, more comfortable. Maybe at 41 I'm just becoming a skeptical old codger :) but I don't see me trading in my current one for it. But because I love MG, I hope they sell a bundle of them.

Coops
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Joined: 05/08/2009

A direct competitor for the Triumph Rocket 3.

Saw it at NEC last week - it is a monster. Not my cup of tea but really good to look at and a real pose machine. I wouldn't want to pick one up off the deck though.

unconventional rebel
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Joined: 16/01/2010

Interesting that as a fellow Cali owner you have come to more or less the same conclusion as me loubike. I hope they keep an 1100 model in the line-up.

Somewhat surprised at your fuel figures though, even with a heavy Russian chair on the side and in need of a fettle I've never dropped to 35mpg on the Cali Ali. Unless that's US gallons? My old carb model Cali 111 never gave less than low 40'mpg, that's with over 80k on the clock.

loubike
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Rebel, I think the economy difference has to do with my US gallons as you note.

Unfortunately, the standard 2V 1100 has already been dropped from every model in their new lineup. Like you, I kinda wish they would have kept a smaller framed cruiser to go with the big new bike and put the 4 valve 1200 engine in it that now powers the Norge and Griso. But oh well, I'm plenty satisfied with my now old school :) Guzzi.

kevash
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MoDa wrote:
Kev, there seems to be something wrong with your fuel consumption numbers. You write

"30mpg (13.5km/l, 7.4l/100km, 25.0mpg US), and at higher speeds on more open roads only 38mpg (10.6km/l, 9.4l/100km, 31.6mpg US)"

Did you perhaps mistake 30mpg for 38mpg and vice versa.

Oops, yes, I got the conversions the wrong way around, it should be 30mpg (10.6km/l, 9.4l/100km, 31.6mpg US) and 38mpg (13.5km/l, 7.4l/100km, 25.0mpg US). Its corrected in the review now, thanks for pointing it out.

kevash
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Joined: 05/10/2008

MoDa wrote:
Kev, there seems to be something wrong with your fuel consumption numbers. You write

"30mpg (13.5km/l, 7.4l/100km, 25.0mpg US), and at higher speeds on more open roads only 38mpg (10.6km/l, 9.4l/100km, 31.6mpg US)"

Did you perhaps mistake 30mpg for 38mpg and vice versa.

Oops, yes, I got the conversions the wrong way around, it should be 30mpg (10.6km/l, 9.4l/100km, 31.6mpg US) and 38mpg (13.5km/l, 7.4l/100km, 25.0mpg US). Its corrected in the review now, thanks for pointing it out.

loubike
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Joined: 08/01/2009

That's a thirsty girl, right there. As I said earlier, however, doesn't surprise me too greatly given the mileage I get on my much smaller California is about 35-38mpg city, 38-42 highway US gallons. Even with the new and advanced platform, I would fully expect the much heavier, more powerful Cali to return considerably less than my now diminutive 550lb, 75 horsepower ride :)